Essays On Ecstasy

Ecstasy Essay

Ecstasy can be known to people as E, X, Adam, eccie, disco biscuits, the love drug, the hug drug,but ecstasy's proper name is MDMA which is short for methylenedioxymethamphetamime. Ecstasy in its pure form, is a white crystalline powder. It is almost always swallowed in tablet or capsule. A typical dose is 100-120mg.

Ecstasy was first manufactured in 1914 in Germany as an appetite suppressant. In the 1950s it was used by psychiatrist as a therapeutic tool to open up patients and increase therapists understanding. Ecstasy takes effect 30-45minutes after taking the pill. The user may experience a time of disorientation and confusion. They will reach their peak at around one to one and a half hours. The effect begins to end and after 4-6 hours it wears off. Ecstasy has become illegal in 1985.


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Most users will claim ecstasy as a safe and easy controlled drug but like all drugs it carries risks. Especially because it is illegal, which means there are no controls placed on its manufacture or distribution. Which means that you might not always get what you paid for. Things like rat poison, cut glass and heroin has turned up in pills sold as ecstasy. Ecstasy related deaths are more likely to be related to its interaction with prescribed medications that the user may be on.

Ecstasy use are the results of dehydration and heatstroke. Dancing in a overcrowded environment while taking ecstasy increases your risk to dehydration and heatstroke because ecstasy raises the body's temperature a few degrees and doesn't allow the body to regulate its own temperature. When the body overheats you lose fluid as much as over three litres in hours. Not replacing that fluid loss with water may lead to dehydration. The common symptoms for suffering for head stroke include failure to sweat, cramps in your limbs or back, headaches, fainting, confusion and vomiting.

Ecstasy is a mood enhancer and it also has a mind stimulant effect, which is why users seem to be able to dance all night.

The effects the drug has on the body can include dryness of mouth, jaw clenching, teeth grinding, sweating, diarrhoea, nausea, dizziness and restlessness. Ecstasy also increases heart rate and blood pressure.

Ecstasy can give permanent damage brain damage because it causes the serotonin which is stored in the brain to go hard. After taking ecstasy a few days later to user starts feeling depressed. Ecstasy works by releasing large amounts of brain chemical serotonin from curtain brain cells. This creates the warm and fuzzy feelings the user feels while on ecstasy. Releasing such large amount of serotonin stops the brain supply and it takes a while for these supplies to be replenished.

Anna Wood a young Sydney girl died in 1995 from complications arising from ecstasy use. She died from hyponatremia which is caused by drinking more water than the body can process. When you drink too much water, it dilutes the sodium in your blood. Without sodium water is released into your body tissues. Your brain can't handle as much swelling as other body tissues, so if it swells too much, it puts pressure on the brain stem, which controls your heart and breathing functions. This condition can be fatal.


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